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    People Foods That Can Harm Your Pet

    Last updated 9 days ago

    Is your pet an experienced beggar? Although pets may think they want—and sometimes love—certain types of “people food,” many foods that are safe for humans can be harmful to cats and dogs. If you think your pet has eaten a food that could be potentially harmful, call your veterinary clinic immediately for care instructions.

    Chocolate

    Neither dogs nor cats should be allowed to eat chocolate. All chocolate, including white chocolate, contains a chemical compound called theobromine; chocolate also contains caffeine. Both theobromine and caffeine can overstimulate your pet’s cardiovascular and nervous systems, causing vomiting, diarrhea, agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heartbeat, seizures, and even death. 

    Avocado
    Avocados and foods made with avocado, such as guacamole, can be toxic for dogs. These fruits contain a substance called persin, which can also be found in the leaves, seeds, and bark of the plant. If you grow avocados at home, make sure to keep your dog away from the plants and any dropped fruit using a fence or a leash.

    Onions and Garlic
    All members of the onion family can be toxic to dogs and cats in any form, including raw, cooked, and powdered. The chemical compounds found in onions and garlic attack your pet’s red blood cells, causing weakness, vomiting, and anemia. Symptoms can take up to five days to appear, so call your veterinarian immediately if your pet has eaten onions or garlic. In severe cases, your pet may need a blood transfusion.

    Grapes and Raisins
    Grapes and raisins can cause digestive discomfort and kidney failure in dogs. Although you may have heard that grapes and raisins can be used as dog treats, avoid this practice and talk to your veterinarian about treats that are healthy and safe for your pet.

    If you have questions about your pet’s diet or are concerned about foods he’s eaten, call Lincoln Avenue Veterinary Clinic at (408) 565-8601. Our experienced veterinary staff can help you handle any pet health issue, from routine checkups to pet surgery. Click through our blog to learn more about important pet health topics.

    Get to Know Dr. Emily Seymour

    Last updated 19 days ago

    At Lincoln Avenue Veterinary Clinic, our veterinarians bring a combined 33 years of experience to the field of pet care in San Jose. Dr. Emily Seymour was born and raised near Philadelphia, PA. During her undergraduate studies in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Boston, she also played on the women’s rugby team. After receiving her undergraduate degree, Dr. Seymour spent time living and working in Cody, Wyoming, and Copperas Cove, Texas, before pursuing veterinary medicine in her home state at the University of Pennsylvania. Today, Dr. Seymour enjoys traveling—her favorite destination is South America and she has spent summers in both Argentina and Ecuador. Her family includes her husband, Travis, her Shar Pei/Rhodesian/Pit Bull mix, Dottie Lou, and her three cats: Schroeder, Tilly, and Scoop; she also raises goats, ducks, guinea fowl, and chickens.

    Dr. Seymour, Dr. Bowden, and Dr. Nagel are pleased to provide pet care at Lincoln Avenue Veterinary Clinic of San Jose. We offer dental exams, pet surgery, spay and neuter services, vaccinations, microchip implants, and more at our comprehensive small animal clinic serving dogs, cats, rabbits, and pocket pets. Visit us online or call (408) 565-8601 to learn more.

    People Foods That Can Harm Your Pet

    Last updated 21 days ago

    Is your pet an experienced beggar? Although pets may think they want—and sometimes love—certain types of “people food,” many foods that are safe for humans can be harmful to cats and dogs. If you think your pet has eaten a food that could be potentially harmful, call your veterinary clinic immediately for care instructions. 

    Chocolate
    Neither dogs nor cats should be allowed to eat chocolate. All chocolate, including white chocolate, contains a chemical compound called theobromine; chocolate also contains caffeine. Both theobromine and caffeine can overstimulate your pet’s cardiovascular and nervous systems, causing vomiting, diarrhea, agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heartbeat, seizures, and even death.

    Avocado
    Avocados and foods made with avocado, such as guacamole, can be toxic for dogs. These fruits contain a substance called persin, which can also be found in the leaves, seeds, and bark of the plant. If you grow avocados at home, make sure to keep your dog away from the plants and any dropped fruit using a fence or a leash.

    Onions and Garlic
    All members of the onion family can be toxic to dogs and cats in any form, including raw, cooked, and powdered. The chemical compounds found in onions and garlic attack your pet’s red blood cells, causing weakness, vomiting, and anemia. Symptoms can take up to five days to appear, so call your veterinarian immediately if your pet has eaten onions or garlic. In severe cases, your pet may need a blood transfusion.

    Grapes and Raisins
    Grapes and raisins can cause digestive discomfort and kidney failure in dogs. Although you may have heard that grapes and raisins can be used as dog treats, avoid this practice and talk to your veterinarian about treats that are healthy and safe for your pet.

    If you have questions about your pet’s diet or are concerned about foods he’s eaten, call Lincoln Avenue Veterinary Clinic at (408) 565-8601. Our experienced veterinary staff can help you handle any pet health issue, from routine checkups to pet surgery. Click through our blog to learn more about important pet health topics.

    Keeping Your Dog Safe This Summer

    Last updated 28 days ago

    Summer is a great time to enjoy outdoor fun and adventure with your pet. However, summer can also present unique health hazards for dogs; knowing how to protect your pet will keep him healthy and safe all season long. If you have more questions about your dog’s health during the summer or any other season, contact your San Jose veterinarian for more information. 

    Heat
    Never leave your pet inside a parked car. It only takes minutes for the air inside a closed vehicle to reach temperatures in excess of 100 degrees, regardless of the temperature outside. If you send your dog outside to play, make sure there is at least one shady spot in your yard for him to rest under. Keep in mind that doghouses can trap heat and should not be considered your dog’s sole source of shelter from the sun. During walks, try to keep your dog on the grass—hot asphalt, cement, or even sand can burn his paws.

    Hydration
    It’s important to provide your dog with a ready source of clean water at all times during the summer. If your pet spends most of his time outdoors, place his water dish in a shaded spot and check the water level in the bowl at least once per day. Empty, rinse, and refill outdoor and indoor water dishes on a regular basis to prevent mold or dirt buildup in the bowl. If you are planning to travel with your pet, bring water and a bowl to provide him with a chance to drink whenever possible. You can also provide your pet with a container of frozen water during long trips; as the water thaws, he’ll have fresh, cool water to drink.

    Lincoln Avenue Veterinary Clinic wants you and your pet to enjoy a fun and safe summer this year. We offer checkups, dental care, vaccinations, and flea and tick control to keep your pet healthy at every stage of life. Please visit our website for more information about our veterinary services, or call (408) 565-8601 to schedule an appointment.

    Dealing with a Mouthing Puppy

    Last updated 1 month ago

    Puppies often display “mouthy” behavior as they explore the world around them. Helping your puppy learn to curb this behavior at appropriate times is an important part of his training.

    This video explains that keeping your pet on a light indoor leash can help to control mouthing during bouts of excitement. Providing chew toys specifically meant for your pet’s use can distract him from objects you don’t want him to mouth. If your puppy doesn’t like a certain type of toy, try using a different toy until you find one that captures his attention.

    Lincoln Avenue Veterinary Clinic provides comprehensive pet health and wellness care in San Jose, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara, and beyond. Call us today at (408) 565-8601 to schedule an exam for your dog, cat, rabbit, guinea pig, ferret, or small rodent. You can find more helpful pet training and behavior tips on our website. 

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